The curse of Mills and Boon

As reported by the Daily Telegraph earlier today Mills and Boon apparantly cause marriage break-ups, adulterous affairs and unwanted pregnancies.

The reason: women are unable to distinguish between real life and romantic novels.

The research, published by the Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care, claims the romantic novels, famously published by Mills and Boon, promote values which run counter to the aims of family planning clinics.

Susan Quilliam, a relationship psychologist and author of the article, told the Telegraph:

“What we see in our consulting rooms is more likely to be informed by Mills & Boon than by the Family Planning Association.”

So can it really be true?  Are modern day women so easily confused? Or is this research more akin to something which might be published by Mills and Boon themselves?

Comments are welcome!

 

 

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About Rachel Conner

Rachel Conner is currently a postgraduate newspaper journalism student at Cardiff University. She graduated in 2010 from the University of Durham with an LLB. View all posts by Rachel Conner

One response to “The curse of Mills and Boon

  • Nicola Conner

    Gosh! What sort of research did she do? Or is this a really lame way of getting publicity for family planning? This claim is as old as novels and exercised the minds of the dear old patriarchy in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is tosh and belongs in the bin along with the fear that educating women will make their brains explode.

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